BRANDOLAND: Talking to God...For You!

Tuesday, January 17, 2006

Ray Nagin: Working for...Developers?

Yo.

Someone else - besides me - has been talking to God:

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin: God mad at America, but also at blacks

"AND GAYS. HE FORGOT TO MENTION 'THE GAYS.'"

What?

"AND THE ACLU."

Right.
NEW ORLEANS – Mayor Ray Nagin suggested Monday that Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and other storms were a sign that "God is mad at America" and at black communities, too, for tearing themselves apart with violence and political infighting.

"Surely God is mad at America. He sent us hurricane after hurricane after hurricane, and it's destroyed and put stress on this country," Nagin, who is black, said as he and other city leaders marked Martin Luther King Day.

"Surely he doesn't approve of us being in Iraq under false pretenses.

But surely he is upset at black America also.

We're not taking care of ourselves."
That true?

"THAT AND...I'M NOT HAPPY ABOUT THE BULLS CURRENT RECORD. 15-22. THEY CAN DO BETTER."

Agreed.

"YOU KNOW WHAT? 'F' THIS. YOU KNOW WHAT CAUSES A HURRICANE?!"
The factors to form a (hurricane) include a pre-existing weather disturbance, warm tropical oceans, moisture, and relatively light winds aloft. If the right conditions persist and allow it to create a feedback loop by maximizing the energy intake possible, for example, such as high winds to increase the rate of evaporation, they can combine to produce the violent winds, incredible waves, torrential rains, and floods associated with this phenomenon.
"COGITO ERGO SUM...NOT ME!"
Nagin also promised that New Orleans will be a "chocolate" city again.

Many of the city's black neighborhoods were heavily damaged by Katrina.
"'CHOCOLATE CITY.' THAT'S A PARLIAMENT RECORD, RIGHT?"

I think so.
"It's time for us to come together. It's time for us to rebuild New Orleans – the one that should be a chocolate New Orleans," the mayor said. "This city will be a majority African American city. It's the way God wants it to be. You can't have New Orleans no other way. It wouldn't be New Orleans."

Nagin described an imaginary conversation with King, the late civil rights leader.
"TALKIN' TO ME AND MLK?! THAT'S A BIG DAY."
"I said, 'What is it going to take for us to move on and live your dream and make it a reality?' He said, 'I don't think that we need to pay attention any more as much about other folks and racists on the other side.'
And by "other folks" he means...

"DEVELOPERS AND PEOPLE WHO WANT TO LEVEL THE 9TH WARD."

Copy that.
He said, 'The thing we need to focus on as a community – black folks I'm talking about – is ourselves.'"

Nagin said he also asked: "Why is black-on-black crime such an issue? Why do our young men hate each other so much that they look their brother in the face and they will take a gun and kill him in cold blood?"

The reply, Nagin said, was: "We as a people need to fix ourselves first."
Whoa.

"DUDE IS TRIPPING ON HIS BLACK COMMUNITY."

And why do you think that is?

"BECAUSE THEY ARE TRIPPING ON HIM."

And why is that?

A Will-to-Rebuild Deadline Proposed for New Orleans

Well, well, well.

"A $12-billion buyout is planned if residents don't stake a convincing claim in four months."

Excerpts from the LA Times:
NEW ORLEANS — Mayor C. Ray Nagin's commission to revive this city on Wednesday proposed that residents of the districts most heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina get FOUR MONTHS to demonstrate strong support for rebuilding their neighborhoods or face the possibility of having to sell to the government.
And the districts most heavily damged were in...

"CHOCOLATE CITY."

That's right:
The proposal, a centerpiece of the mayor's "Bring New Orleans Back" recovery effort, drew outrage from residents and community activists, who argued that many citizens — especially the African Americans who predominated the flood-struck areas — might be forced out of the city for good.
"CAN YOU SAY, 'HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO - NEW ORLEANS?"
By allowing residents to help determine their neighborhood's fate, the Nagin commission hoped to defuse a flashpoint in the debate over how to restore the ravaged city: Should all of New Orleans be rebuilt, or should low-lying neighborhoods be returned to wetlands and green space that would serve as a natural barrier against floods?

The vast swath of the city in question — which includes parts of the Gentilly, Mid-City, Lakeview and Lower 9th Ward neighborhoods — represents about half of New Orleans.

If residents could not reach a consensus to rebuild, city planners would shrink the footprint of New Orleans.
"THAT OR...THEY'D BUILD A BUNCH OF HOTELS AND CASINOS."
"None of us want to be in this particular place, but Katrina has forced us to take a good, hard look at what we need to do to rebuild our city," Nagin said. "The realities are that we will have limited resources to redevelop our city…. The other reality is this report is controversial. It pushes the edge of the envelope.

It probably says some things to some people they are probably misinterpreting."
Yeah: Like, "Sorry, bud, you're probably gonna lose your home."

"AND IF YOU BELIEVE THE MAYOR WHEN HE SAYS THAT I'M REALLY 'MAD' AT YOU -- "

You might just throw in the towel.

Capice?
Despite Nagin's effort to ease tensions, residents across racial and class lines lashed out Wednesday at what they considered a land grab engineered by the city's elite.

Much of their ire was heaped on New Orleans developer Joseph C. Canizaro, a key architect of the plan, whose name elicited boos from the standing-room-only auditorium crowd.
Google-monkeys, you have your assignment: Joseph C. Canizaro.
"How many people from my backyard are up there?" Harvey Bender, a laid-off city maintenance worker from eastern New Orleans, yelled at the officials. "I'm ready to rebuild and I'm not letting you take mine," he said. "I'm going to fight, whatever it takes, to rebuild my property. It's going to be baby Iraq for Joe Canizaro."
"THAT'S THE SPIRIT."
Under the plan — which can go forward with Nagin's approval — New Orleans would impose a moratorium Jan. 20 on building permits in the areas hardest hit by Katrina's floodwaters.

Residents then would have to demonstrate there was sufficient critical mass in their area to rebuild to warrant public investment in schools and city facilities, possibly by showing that half of the population planned to come back.
Here's the key info:
To accelerate the process, Nagin's commission is asking the Federal Emergency Management Agency to release updated flood plain maps, which could effectively make the decision for many homeowners by raising home insurance rates and setting other new financial barriers to redevelopment.

Neighborhoods that failed to meet the critical-mass test would be shrunk or eliminated altogether; a new city agency called the Crescent City Redevelopment Corp. then would buy out residents OR SEIZE THEIR PROPERTIES THROUGH EMINENT DOMAIN.
Hey, hey, hey.

One more time:
A new city agency...then would buy out residents or seize their properties through eminent domain.

The estimated cost of the buyouts: $12 billion.

Federal legislation introduced by Rep. Richard H. Baker (R-La.) proposes to reimburse homeowners 60% of their pre-Katrina equity.
Wow.

Ask yourself one question: How would you feel...if someone offered you 60% of the "pre-disaster" value of your home...without letting you rebuild...or deal...in the first place.

"CAN YOU SAY, 'MANDALAY BAY - NEW ORLEANS?"
The Nagin commission plan would go further, compensating displaced homeowners the remaining 40% with federal community development block grant money and FEMA funding.

But that federal funding, like many other elements of the ambitious plan, ultimately would need the support of Congress and President Bush -
"GOOD LUCK!"
— who is scheduled to make a public appearance in New Orleans today and meet with the co-chairman of Nagin's commission, healthcare executive Maurice L. Lagarde III.

*

Some critics, who had complained all along that Nagin's commission was stacked with developers and other business leaders --
You're kidding?
Some critics...said the proposal was proof that the mayor was allowing moneyed interests to draw up the reconstruction, to the detriment of the city's working poor.

"To us, that's Katrina cleansing — the removal of blacks from the city," said Mtangulizi Sanyika of the African American Leadership Project, a group that organized a summit of black community leaders today to discuss alternative plans to revive all of New Orleans.
Now...

Go back and read the mayor's comments re: God, Katrina and the black community.
""Surely (God) doesn't approve of us being in Iraq under false pretenses. But surely he is upset at black America also.

We're not taking care of ourselves.

We as a people need to fix ourselves first."
"METHINKS HE'S 'SUGGESTING' THAT 'THEY' TAKE CARE OF THEMSELVES...BY TAKING 'THE DEAL.'"

Gee...ya think?

We'll see how this shakes out: Pay close attention, kiddos.

"I'M NOT MAD, YOU KNOW. I WAS PISSED OFF ABOUT THE REFS IN THE STEELER GAME, BUT, HEY, EVERYTHING WORKED OUT THE WAY IT WAS SUPPOSED TO."

More later...

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